"When you plant lettuce, if it does not grow well, you don’t blame the lettuce. You look for reasons it is not doing well. It may need fertilizer, or more water, or less sun. You never blame the lettuce. Yet if we have problems with our friends or family, we blame the other person. But if we know how to take care of them, they will grow well, like the lettuce. Blaming has no positive effect at all, nor does trying to persuade using reason and argument. That is my experience. No blame, no reasoning, no argument, just understanding. If you understand, and you show that you understand, you can love, and the situation will change."

― Thích Nhất Hạnh

"That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it."

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (via bookmania)

bobbycaputo:

Victoria Siemer Transforms The Human Experience Into Computerized Error Messages

Brooklyn-based graphic designer Victoria Siemer, also known as Witchoria, has an ongoing photography series updated weekly called ‘Human Error” in which the artist digitally overlays an existential or lovelorn computerized error message over a scanned Polaroid. 

(Continue Reading)

(via ichoosecake)

theatlantic:

7 Million Afghans Just Dealt a Blow to the Taliban

In a nation more associated with calamity than consensus, the initial results of Saturday’s Afghan presidential election are startling.
Despite Taliban threats to attack polling stations nationwide, the same percentage of Afghans turned out to vote—roughly 58 percent, or 7 million out of 12 million eligible voters—as did Americans in the 2012 U.S. presidential race. Instead of collapsing, Afghan security forces effectively secured the vote. And a leading candidate to replace Hamid Karzai is Ashraf Ghani, a former World Bank technocrat who has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from Columbia University, a Lebanese Christian wife, and an acclaimed book and TED talk entitled “Fixing Failed States.”
"Relative to what we were expecting, it’s very hard to not conclude that this was a real defeat for the Taliban," Andrew Wilder, an American expert on Afghanistan, said in a telephone interview from Kabul on Monday. "And a very good day for the Afghan people."
Two forces that have long destabilized the country—its political elite and its neighbors—could easily squander the initial success. Evidence of large-scale fraud could undermine the legitimacy of the election and exacerbate long-running ethnic divides. And outside powers could continue to fund and arm the Taliban and disgruntled Afghan warlords, as they have for decades.
Read more. [Image: Tim Wimborne/Reuters]

theatlantic:

7 Million Afghans Just Dealt a Blow to the Taliban

In a nation more associated with calamity than consensus, the initial results of Saturday’s Afghan presidential election are startling.

Despite Taliban threats to attack polling stations nationwide, the same percentage of Afghans turned out to vote—roughly 58 percent, or 7 million out of 12 million eligible voters—as did Americans in the 2012 U.S. presidential race. Instead of collapsing, Afghan security forces effectively secured the vote. And a leading candidate to replace Hamid Karzai is Ashraf Ghani, a former World Bank technocrat who has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from Columbia University, a Lebanese Christian wife, and an acclaimed book and TED talk entitled “Fixing Failed States.”

"Relative to what we were expecting, it’s very hard to not conclude that this was a real defeat for the Taliban," Andrew Wilder, an American expert on Afghanistan, said in a telephone interview from Kabul on Monday. "And a very good day for the Afghan people."

Two forces that have long destabilized the country—its political elite and its neighbors—could easily squander the initial success. Evidence of large-scale fraud could undermine the legitimacy of the election and exacerbate long-running ethnic divides. And outside powers could continue to fund and arm the Taliban and disgruntled Afghan warlords, as they have for decades.

Read more. [Image: Tim Wimborne/Reuters]

"Sometimes we speak clumsily and create internal knots in others. Then we say, “I was just telling the truth.” It may be the truth, but if our way of speaking causes unnecessary suffering, it is not Right Speech. The truth must be presented in ways that others can accept. Words that damage or destroy are not Right Speech. Before you speak, understand the person you are speaking to. Consider each word carefully before you say anything, so that your speech is “Right” in both form and content."

— Thicht Nhat Hanh

tastefullyoffensive:

Game of Cats

This is too much

(via unimpressedcats)

"rural America has a big demographic problem —- young people move away for jobs, education and the freedom of the modern world. Of course that’s always been true, right? But this economy sure isn’t helping to stem the bleeding. But for some reason those salt of the earth folks seem to believe it will all be fixed if only we stop taxing Wall Street investment bankers and wealthy CEOs."

What an awesome con job … (via wilwheaton)

We really have to stop this “us v. them” mindset. It’s not getting us anywhere, just making us all afraid or distrustful of one another. The USA is unique in that it has several regional subcultures - why can’t that be a strength instead if a point of contention?

I have lived and worked both rurally and in urban environments and encourage you all / y’all to get out of your own comfort zones and find beauty and logic outside of where you’ve gotten accustomed to finding it. Gaining the trust and respect of someone entirely different from you is one of the most humbling things - try it!

(via wilwheaton)

No helmet?!

No helmet?!

(via buddhistcyclist)

mymodernmet:

The stunning Nasir al-mulk Mosque hides a gorgeous secret between the walls of its fairly traditional exterior: stepping inside is like walking into a kaleidoscope of colors. Every day, the rays of the early morning sun shine through colorful stained-glass windows, transforming the halls into a dazzling wonderland of rich hues, patterns, and light that play on the floor of the mosque.

(via travelthisworld)

fotojournalismus:

Vrindavan, India | March 14, 2014

Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal (coloured powder) unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. 

(Photos by Ahmad Masood/ReutersManish Swarup/AP, Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images, Harish Tyagi/EPA)